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HCHS Joins GRE4T Initiative

The Hart County Charter System is excited to announce that Hart County High School is now one of 53 schools in the state selected to join the second year of The GRE4T Initiative: Georgia’s Pathway to Personalized Learning.

GRE4T is an $18.5 million federal grant to expand virtual and personalized learning in the state.

In furthering professional learning opportunities, Hart County High School plans to develop a team within the school to work with officials from the Georgia Department of Education. The goal is to expand personalized learning techniques, so the needs of every student are met in the classroom.

“We’re excited about partnering with the Department of Education on the GRE4T Initiative and really looking at personalized learning for our students to make sure we’re meeting the needs of all students,” Hart County High School Principal Kevin Gaines said.

While Hart County High School already implements personalized learning strategies, such as utilizing targeted advisement groups with advisors who meet with their at-risk students and daily “Bulldog Time” for student enrichment or remediation, the school is always seeking new ways to support each individual student.

“This three-year grant will ensure long-term vision, leadership, and success using research-informed strategies for personalized learning," said Dr. Caitlin McMunn Dooley, GaDOE's Deputy Superintendent of Teaching & Learning.

Georgia’s schools will use GRE4T funding to improve the professional learning available to leaders and educators on personalized learning, expand student connectivity, and improve the infrastructure of – and expand access to – the Georgia Virtual School (GaVS). The initiative supports new, innovative ways to access education with an emphasis on meeting students' needs during the coronavirus national emergency.

“In Georgia, we are committed to building a more personalized and connected educational system, and continuing to leverage virtual learning more effectively, both during the COVID-19 pandemic and long-term," State School Superintendent Richard Woods said. “These funds will help us build that system and expand personalized learning opportunities for our students."